Jaeger-LeCoultre presents a watch made with a meteorite


Jaeger-LeCoultre presents a watch made with a meteorite. the Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3

October 29, 2019: In 2013, Jaeger-LeCoultre first introduced the Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3 to mark the maison's 180th anniversary. Combining a third-generation interpretation of the Gyrotourbillon with an intriguing and highly unusual instantaneous digital display chronograph, it represents mechanical sophistication of the highest order. But still, Jaeger-LeCoultre wanted to move ahead. 

Jaeger-LeCoultre is now presenting a new version of the Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3, which marries the technical tour-de-force of its signature multi-axis tourbillon to the finest of artistic craftsmanship. The Gyrotourbillon 3 harnesses the exceptional skills of the manufacture's Métiers Rares artisans to elevate the rare and precious timepiece to a new level. With various elements of the dial showcasing hand-guillochage, engraving and grand feu enamel, this new model introduces the rarely seen craft of meteorite inlay.

On the dial side, the intriguing geometric markings of the silvery-grey meteorite are complemented by the subtle glitter of deep blue aventurine and the glow of pure white grand feu enamel. This harmonious interplay of materials, colour and surface pattern is complemented by the warmth and richness of the pink gold case and dial details.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3

Found in Namibia, the Gibeon meteorite chosen for this watch is an iron-nickel alloy with an octahedrite crystal structure, formed by the cooling of the asteroid fragment in outer space over the course of billions of years before it crashed to earth in prehistoric times. The abstract geometric patterns of the intersecting crystal structures shimmer gently when the material catches the light, their irregular arrangement making every slice of meteorite subtly different from all others.

It is on the back of the movement that the meteorite truly takes centre stage. A lively yet subtle mixture of colour and texture – blued screws, ruby jewels, the shiny aspect of the hand-chamfered and hand-polished jewel countersinks, bridges and plates, and the matt finish of the brushed borders of the German silver plates – offsets the abstract geometric patterns of the meteorite, which adorns all of the plates and bridges.

It is work of the utmost refinement and precision, measured in fractions of a millimetre.

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